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Schools and early childhood education and care (ECEC) online training

ASCIA anaphylaxis e-training for Australasian schools

ASCIA anaphylaxis e-training courses for schools was developed by the Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA), the peak professional body in Australasia for allergy and clinical immunology, in conjunction with health, education and early children's education and care (ECEC) services departments and ministries throughout Australasia. The course is reviewed and updated by ASCIA at least annually to ensure that it is consistent with the medical literature and current best medical practice.

Time to complete: 40 minutes to 1 hour.

ASCIA anaphylaxis e-training for Australasian early childhood

This modular course is for early childhood education and care staff from Australia and New Zealand, where face to face anaphylaxis training is not possible, or as a refresher course, or for interim training whilst waiting for face to face training. 

This course has been approved by the Australian Children's Education & Care Quality Authority (ACECQA).

Time to complete: 40 minutes to 1 hour.

Online resources

A&AA Allergy management information for schools and Early Childhood Education and Care

With severe allergies on the rise, no Early Children’s Education and Care service or school can afford to be uninformed about the risks to children in their care. They need to arm themselves with information on food allergy and anaphylaxis and create environments that are safer for all.

Depending on the age of students, teachers can incorporate food allergy into lessons about health and wellbeing, food technology or other related subject areas. This will help to educate all students about life-threatening allergies, creating a much more understanding community for children at risk of anaphylaxis.

Risk minimisation strategies

Examples of risk minimisation strategies for Early Children’s services and schools.

Curriculum resources for primary schools

This resource for Primary school years is designed to provide educators with information for teaching Year K-6 students what allergies are and how to help friends who have them, including being able to recognise a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) and act appropriately when it occurs.

Curriculum resources for secondary schools

This resource for secondary school years is designed to provide educators with information for teaching Year 7-10 students what allergies are and how to help friends who have them, including being able to recognise a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) and act appropriately when it occurs.

Downloadable  resources

Slide presentation primary school students

With a fun and cutting-edge look and feel, the 250K website was designed by young people for young people. It has a strong focus on interactivity and functions more like an App, allowing young people to share information with their friends in novel ways, such as using avatars. Importantly, it allows young people to share their thoughts on a range of topics anonymously. The 250K website is also supported by a slide set that schools will be able to access to help increase awareness about severe allergies.

Slide presentation suitable for primary school students concerning severe allergy.

Slide presentation secondary school students

With a fun and cutting-edge look and feel, the 250K website was designed by young people for young people. It has a strong focus on interactivity and functions more like an App, allowing young people to share information with their friends in novel ways, such as using avatars. Importantly, it allows young people to share their thoughts on a range of topics anonymously. The 250K website is also supported by a slide set that schools will be able to access to help increase awareness about severe allergies.

Slide presentation suitable for primary school students concerning severe allergy.

A food allergy awareness project supported by

This project received funding from the Australian Government Department of Health.

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